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Race and prostate cancer: genomic landscape

Abstract

In the past 20 years, new insights into the genomic pathogenesis of prostate cancer have been provided. Large-scale integrative genomics approaches enabled researchers to characterize the genetic and epigenetic landscape of prostate cancer and to define different molecular subclasses based on the combination of genetic alterations, gene expression patterns and methylation profiles. Several molecular drivers of prostate cancer have been identified, some of which are different in men of different races. However, the extent to which genomics can explain racial disparities in prostate cancer outcomes is unclear. Future collaborative genomic studies overcoming the underrepresentation of non-white patients and other minority populations are essential.

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Fig. 1: Prevalence of genomic alterations in patients with primary prostate cancer stratified according to self-reported race.

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C.A.G., J.O., I.W., P.L., S.P.B., B.A.H.A.A., F.R.S., D.E.S., C.B. and J.E.S. researched data for the article. All authors contributed substantially to discussion of the content. All authors wrote the article. All authors reviewed and/or edited the manuscript before submission.

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D.E.S. reports personal fees from Boston Scientific, AstraZeneca, Janssen, and Blue Earth. J.E.S. is supported by the Frederick J. and Theresa Dow Foundation of the New York Community Trust, Vinney Scholars Award and a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Physician-Scientist Training Award. F.R.S. is supported by NCI CA2333216, CA043703, CA241956 and CA254566. The other authors declare no competing interests.

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Arenas-Gallo, C., Owiredu, J., Weinstein, I. et al. Race and prostate cancer: genomic landscape. Nat Rev Urol 19, 547–561 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41585-022-00622-0

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