The global response to the COVID-19 pandemic: how have immunology societies contributed?

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic is shining a spotlight on the field of immunology like never before. To appreciate the diverse ways in which immunologists have contributed, Nature Reviews Immunology invited the president of the International Union of Immunological Societies and the presidents of 15 other national immunology societies to discuss how they and their members responded following the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

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Acknowledgements

F.O. acknowledges the members of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) Executive Committee and particularly the Secretary General for their contributions. She thanks the members of the publication committee led by R. Carsetti for their efforts and leadership in supporting the IUIS/Frontiers scientific webinars. She also thanks Frontiers for its continued partnership with the IUIS, which has been instrumental to the success of the webinars. A.D., M.M., B.M. and M.D.S.N. thank the Senegalese Ministry of Health and Social Action and Ministry of High Education, Research and Innovation for their support. The British Society for Immunology (BSI) coronavirus work is supported by the Lorna and Yuti Chernajovsky Biomedical Research Foundation, with additional support from the following BSI Gold Corporate Members: 10x Genomics, Fluidigm, Miltenyi Biotec and NanoString. H.K. acknowledges the great contribution of the Japanese Society for Immunology (JSI) executive board members K. Takeda (Osaka University), K. Hase (Keio University), O. Takeuchi (Kyoto University) and A. Takaoka (Hokkaido University) for supporting JSI’s emphasis on solidarity for scientists, and extends sincere appreciation to them on behalf of all JSI members. M.S. thanks the following members of the South African Immunology Society Executive Committee for their input: E. Mayne (University of the Witwatersrand and National Health Laboratory Service), C. Gray (University of Cape Town and National Health Laboratory Service), K. Kgoadi (University of Cape Town), S. Buldeo (Neuberg Global Laboratory), C. Worsley (University of the Witwatersrand), H. Ranchod (National Institute for Communicable Diseases), J. Peter (University of Cape Town), T. Scriba (University of Cape Town) and R. Glashoff (Stellenbosch University). Nature Reviews Immunology apologizes to all of the regional and national immunology societies that we were not able to feature in this article for reasons of space restrictions. We encourage all of our readers to join and support the work of their relevant immunology societies. Finally, we thank all immunologists and immunology societies for their monumental contributions to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Correspondence to Faith Osier or Jenny P. Y. Ting or John Fraser or Bart N. Lambrecht or Ricardo T. Gazzinelli or Arne N. Akbar or Kamala D. Patel or Yuzhang Wu or Ana B. Perez or Thomas Kamradt or Mira Barda-Saad or Angela Santoni or Hiroshi Kiyono or Valeriy Chereshnev or Alioune Dieye or Melinda Suchard.

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J.P.Y.T. is a co-founder of IMMvention Therapeutix and Goldcrest Bio. All other authors declare no competing interests.

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Osier, F., Ting, J.P.Y., Fraser, J. et al. The global response to the COVID-19 pandemic: how have immunology societies contributed?. Nat Rev Immunol 20, 594–602 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41577-020-00428-4

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