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From the Human Cell Atlas to dynamic immune maps in human disease

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The Human Cell Atlas Project is an ambitious international effort to profile all cells in the body. Capturing the plasticity and complexity of human immune cells will be challenging but will provide an unprecedented resource for future research.

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RELATED LINKS

Human Cell Atlas Project: www.humancellatlas.org

The Lifetime Initiative: https://lifetime-fetflagship.eu

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Correspondence to Ido Amit.

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Further reading

Fig. 1: The progression from healthy to diseased tissue involves distinct processes in single cells encoded by molecular networks.