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NAFLD

What are the clinical settings and outcomes of lean NAFLD?

The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has increased rapidly and is associated with obesity in epidemiology and pathogenesis. A new study reports that hepatic and extrahepatic complications can develop in lean individuals with NAFLD, highlighting the importance of metabolic phenotypes in NAFLD assessment instead of BMI-based approaches.

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Correspondence to Jian-Gao Fan.

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Ren, TY., Fan, JG. What are the clinical settings and outcomes of lean NAFLD?. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 18, 289–290 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41575-021-00433-5

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