Review Article | Published:

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for in vivo biosensing

Nature Reviews Chemistry volume 1, Article number: 0060 (2017) | Download Citation

Abstract

Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is of interest for biomedical analysis and imaging because of its sensitivity, specificity and multiplexing capabilities. The successful application of SERS for in vivo biosensing requires probes to be biocompatible and procedures to be minimally invasive, challenges that have respectively been met by developing new nanoprobes and instrumentation. This Review presents recent developments in these areas, describing case studies in which sensors have been implemented, as well as outlining shortcomings that must be addressed before SERS sees clinical use.

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Acknowledgements

K.F. and S.L. thank the Leverhulme Trust for financial support through Research Project Grant RPG-2012-758.

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    • Stacey Laing
    •  & Lauren E. Jamieson

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Centre for Molecular Nanometrology, WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Technology and Innovation Centre, University of Strathclyde, 99 George Street, Glasgow G1 1RD, UK.

    • Stacey Laing
    • , Lauren E. Jamieson
    • , Karen Faulds
    •  & Duncan Graham

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Correspondence to Duncan Graham.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/s41570-017-0060

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