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Cardiovascular health concerns in sexual and gender minority populations

Growing evidence indicates that sexual and gender minority populations might be at greater risk of cardiovascular disease than the general population. Additional population and clinical health research is needed to inform the development of tailored, evidence-based interventions to promote the cardiovascular health of sexual and gender minority populations.

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Acknowledgements

B.A.C. is supported by a career development award from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the USA. C.G.S. is supported by a career development award from the AHA.

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Correspondence to Billy A. Caceres or Carl G. Streed Jr.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Caceres, B.A., Streed, C.G. Cardiovascular health concerns in sexual and gender minority populations. Nat Rev Cardiol 18, 227–228 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41569-021-00518-3

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