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The human microbiome and immune response shift during spaceflight

The largest-ever study of alterations in the host’s microbiome and immune response during spaceflight shows shifts in the skin and oral microbiota during flight that are consistent across astronauts, with numerous changes in microbial gene expression that also correlate to host immune activity.

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Fig. 1: Study design.

References

  1. Rooney, B. V., Crucian, B. E., Pierson, D. L., Laudenslager, M. L. & Mehta, S. K. Herpes virus reactivation in astronauts during spaceflight and its application on Earth. Front. Microbiol. 10, 16 (2019). This manuscript describes herpesvirus dynamics as a result of immune stress during spaceflight.

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This is a summary of: Tierney, B. T. et al. Longitudinal multi-omics analysis of host microbiome architecture and immune responses during short-term spaceflight. Nat. Microbiol. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-024-01635-8 (2024).

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The human microbiome and immune response shift during spaceflight. Nat Microbiol 9, 1640–1641 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-024-01660-7

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