PSYCHOLOGY

Remembering together

What is the connection between the curated narrative of a society and the representations of memories in the individual brains of its members? In a new study, Gagnepain and colleagues show that the organization of memories in the brain reflects the structure of a culture’s shared discourse.

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Correspondence to Christopher Baldassano.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Siegelman, M., Baldassano, C. Remembering together. Nat Hum Behav 4, 132–133 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-019-0789-x

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