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Video game loot boxes are psychologically akin to gambling

Nature Human Behaviour (2018) | Download Citation

Video games are increasingly exposing young players to randomized in-game reward mechanisms, purchasable for real money — so-called loot boxes. Do loot boxes constitute a form of gambling?

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. School of Psychology, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    • Aaron Drummond
  2. International Media Psychology Laboratory, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    • Aaron Drummond
    •  & James D. Sauer
  3. Psychology, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

    • James D. Sauer

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Aaron Drummond.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0360-1