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Anthropology: Tradition's hidden economy

Nature Human Behaviour volume 1, Article number: 0070 (2017) | Download Citation

Whether ritual behaviour reliably predicts cooperation is hotly debated. A study evaluating religion and social links among all adult residents of two South Indian villages finds that religious practice clearly predicts reciprocal cooperative ties. Rigorous quantitative field studies like this are a powerful way to resolve long-standing debates.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Joseph Bulbulia is Professor of Religious Studies at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington 6140, New Zealand.

    • Joseph Bulbulia

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

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Correspondence to Joseph Bulbulia.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-017-0070

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