Extended Data Fig. 6: Historical and projected latitudinal displacements of temperature anomalies. | Nature Geoscience

Extended Data Fig. 6: Historical and projected latitudinal displacements of temperature anomalies.

From: Changes in Northern Hemisphere temperature variability shaped by regional warming patterns

Extended Data Fig. 6

The latitudinal displacements of cold (left column) and warm (right column) temperature anomalies, for (a,b) anomalies in the NH (between latitudes 30° to 70°) during winter, (c,d) east-central North America during winter, and (e,f) central Europe during summer. The displacements are calculated as the latitudinal difference between the initial location of the temperature anomalies and the location during its maximum intensity, while it is inside the region box. Solid (dashed) lines denote the historical (projected) simulations. Shading denotes the 95% confidence interval. In each panel, the mean displacement is shown by the solid (dashed) vertical line for the historical (projected) simulations. The relative change in the mean value of the displacements (\(\Delta _{mean}\)) is shown in each panel. The averaged displacement of cold anomalies is negative (i.e., equatorward) while that of warm anomalies is positive (i.e., poleward) in all cases, expect for east-central North America where the averaged displacement of warm anomalies is negative (this is potentially due to the effect of the Rockies). For all cases, the averaged displacements do not change much in the projected climates, with the relative changes in the mean ranging from 3% to 18% (the latter is achieved for the east-central North America case, where the mean is close to zero, hence the relative change appears larger although the values themselves are very close to each other).

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