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PLANETARY SCIENCE

Why the Moon is so like the Earth

The Moon’s isotopic composition is uncannily similar to Earth’s. This may be the signature of a magma ocean on Earth at the time of the Moon-forming giant impact, according to numerical simulations.

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Correspondence to H. Jay Melosh.

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Fig. 1: Snapshots of a simulation of the Moon-forming impact.