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AQUATIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

Stream metabolism heats up

Nature Geosciencevolume 11pages384385 (2018) | Download Citation

Higher stream temperatures as the climate warms could lead to lower ecosystem productivity and higher CO2 emissions in streams. An analysis of stream ecosystems finds that such changes will be greatest in the warmest and most productive streams.

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  1. Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA

    • James B. Heffernan

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Correspondence to James B. Heffernan.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-018-0148-y