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Sensory biology: Bats united by cochlear development

Bat species that echolocate using signals from their larynx, and those that do not, all share a similar pattern of inner ear development that is distinct from other mammals, implying a single evolutionary origin of laryngeal echolocation.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. M. Brock Fenton is in the Department of Biology, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5B7, Canada.

    • M. Brock Fenton
  2. John M. Ratcliffe is in the Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada.

    • John M. Ratcliffe

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to M. Brock Fenton or John M. Ratcliffe.