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Strategies to improve the impact of the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Cities

Abstract

The planned Special Report on Climate Change and Cities represents a key opportunity to connect the IPCC assessment process to the topics of cities and global urbanization, which are both critical elements of climate adaptation and mitigation during the current ‘decade of action’. To help seize this opportunity, we recommend the development of inreach and outreach strategies that can help the report to have greater impact. The new strategies could allow interest groups, including practitioners and policymakers, along with researchers and IPCC representatives to be more coordinated and enhance the utilization of the assessment results. These advances would be useful not only for the upcoming Special Report but also for future IPCC reports and other comparable scientific assessments.

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Fig. 1: Potential inreach and outreach strategies, and engagement of city representatives and interests in the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Cities.

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Acknowledgements

Special thanks to M. Garschagen, LMU University Munich, for providing comments on earlier draft of this paper. Additional special thanks to C. Overton, City University of New York, for editorial work on the paper.

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W.S., D.R. and K.C.S. contributed equally to this paper.

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Correspondence to William Solecki.

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W.S. is a co-founder and co-leader of the Urban Climate Change Research Network. D.R. is an advisor to the United Cities and Local Governments. K.C.S. declares no competing interests.

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Solecki, W., Roberts, D. & Seto, K.C. Strategies to improve the impact of the IPCC Special Report on Climate Change and Cities. Nat. Clim. Chang. 14, 685–691 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-024-02060-9

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