FAST RADIO BURSTS

Chiming again and again

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Since the discovery of the first repeating fast radio burst in 2016, debate has raged over whether it represented a distinct population. With the recent detection of a second repeater using CHIME, the debate is closer to being settled.

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Fig. 1: Pulses from the two repeating fast radio bursts.

panel a reproduced from ref. 4, Springer Nature Ltd; data for panel b provided by Jason Hessels.

References

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Correspondence to Emily Petroff.

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Petroff, E. Chiming again and again. Nat Astron 3, 133–134 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41550-019-0700-8

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