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Black Holes: The making of a monster

Nature Astronomy volume 1, Article number: 0108 (2017) | Download Citation

The biggest black holes in the Universe were in place soon after the Big Bang. Explaining how they formed so rapidly is a daunting challenge, but the latest simulations give clues to how this may have occurred.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Lucio Mayer is at the Center for Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology, University of Zurich, Winterhurestrasse 190, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

    • Lucio Mayer

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Correspondence to Lucio Mayer.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-017-0108

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