Fig. 2: Trait values after eight generations of experimental evolution. | Nature Communications

Fig. 2: Trait values after eight generations of experimental evolution.

From: Natural selection increases female fitness by reversing the exaggeration of a male sexually selected trait

Fig. 2

Replicate populations (3/treatment) were exposed to either male-only predation (middle columns), female-only predation (right-hand columns) or no predation (controls: left-hand columns), and effects on a range of traits was assessed. Traits were: Male mandible size (mm) (a), Male abdomen size (mg) (b), Male body size (mg) (c), Female lifetime reproductive success (LRS: offspring number) (d), Female abdomen size (mg) (e), and Female body size (mg) (f) (shown are upper and lower quartile (the box) with medians (lines) and each dot represents the mean of one replicate population). Only populations evolve and thus population is the biologically relevant unit of replication in an experimental evolution study. Mean population values were estimated by measuring 20 individual males and female beetles/population. Source data are provided as a Source Data file.

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