Fig. 1: Location map and acoustic imagery of gas flares. | Nature Communications

Fig. 1: Location map and acoustic imagery of gas flares.

From: Gas hydrate dissociation linked to contemporary ocean warming in the southern hemisphere

Fig. 1

a Location of the Rio Grande Cone (inset) and bathymetry of the study area showing the locations of piston cores (PC; red dots) and CTDs (white hexagons), the core transect shown in Fig. 5 (yellow dashed line), a regional seismic profile (red line), and the extent of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV)-borne multibeam bathymetry (grey area); b a 3D perspective view of the seafloor from AUV-borne multibeam bathymetry showing the pockmark field downslope of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR) outcrop observed on seismic data; c raw water column imagery from AUV-mounted side-scan sonar showing dozens of gas flares rising from the seafloor; d water column and seafloor backscatter imagery from hull-mounted MBES showing major gas flare clusters ca. 50 m high (coloured features) aligned along the 540 m isobath; e AUV-mounted side-scan sonar (SSS) seafloor imagery showing high backscatter areas downslope of the BSR outcrop, consistent with the presence of carbonates within the pockmarks, and the location of sub-bottom profiles (SBP); f AUV-mounted side-scan sonar seafloor imagery showing the locations of gas flares (black dots), piston cores (red dots), conductivity, temperature, depth profiles (CTD; white hexagons), and bubble streams observed at seafloor using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV; yellow stars). Gas hydrate was recovered in piston cores PC66, PC95, and PC97.

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