Fig. 3: Road microplastics in snow and ice. | Nature Communications

Fig. 3: Road microplastics in snow and ice.

From: Atmospheric transport is a major pathway of microplastics to remote regions

Fig. 3

Annual average concentrations of road microplastics in Arctic snow (ad) in ng kg−1. Snow concentrations were calculated using daily fields of sea-ice area fraction and total snowfall from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) combined with daily modelled deposition. The latter includes results from 120 simulations that accounted for different airborne fractions (five members for each of the PM2.5 and PM10 fractions), particle size distribution (eight members for each of the PM2.5 and PM10 fractions) and CCN/IN (cloud condensation nuclei/ice nuclei) efficiency (three different sets of scavenging coefficients per fraction) following a log-normal distribution (see “Methods”). Monthly variation of concentrations of road microplastics in the Arctic snow in both sizes (PM2.5 and PM10) are presented in (e, f). For the latter, model results using emissions from both methods are presented. Tyre wear particles (TWPs) and brake wear particles (BWPs) uncertainties have been calculated as the geometric standard deviation of all the 120 simulations with different assumption (airborne fraction, size distribution and CCN/IN efficiency, see “Methods”). Note that the smallest concentrations occur in mid-summer (e, f).

Back to article page