Fig. 5: Blocking protrusions prevents adhesion development. | Nature Communications

Fig. 5: Blocking protrusions prevents adhesion development.

From: Post-surgical adhesions are triggered by calcium-dependent membrane bridges between mesothelial surfaces

Fig. 5

a In vitro adhesion assay screening using the Prestwick library consisting of 1280 FDA compounds. b Nanoluciferase adhesion carriers-to-monolayer assay 24 h after desiccation, and after treatment with small molecules targeted against core adhesion genes (10 µM). Four biological replicates; ***p < 0.001, two-tailed Mann–Whitney. c Cre-exchange assay (see Methods) with nanoluciferase expressing Met-5A cells after treatment with small-molecule inhibitors for 24 h (10 µM). Four biological replicates; ***p < 0.001, two-tailed Mann–Whitney. d Epi-fluorescent representative images of Met-5A cells stably expressing membranous GFP, stressed with desiccation and treated with small-molecule compounds for 24 h (10 µM), showing impaired protrusion development. Representative images of ten biological replicates; Scale bar, 10 µm. e Nanoluciferase adhesion carriers-to-monolayer assay 24 h after desiccation, and after treatment with small-interfering RNA against core adhesion genes (1 µg). Four biological replicates; ***p < 0.001, two-tailed t test. f Adhesion score 5 days after injury, of mice treated with small-molecule compounds dissolved in 2% cellulose that was applied topically at the injury site once before closure. Four biological replicates; *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey. g Adhesion tissue sections derived from (f), immuno-stained for EMT and mesenchymal markers. Representative images of four biological replicates; Scale bar, 500 µm (overview) and 50 µm (inlet). Error bars represent standard error of the mean.

Back to article page