Fig. 4: Past and simulated future Arctic ozone showing the influence of meteorology and additional CFC-11 emissions. | Nature Communications

Fig. 4: Past and simulated future Arctic ozone showing the influence of meteorology and additional CFC-11 emissions.

From: Delay in recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole from unexpected CFC-11 emissions

Fig. 4

Mean column ozone (DU) averaged from 90oN to 60oN for a February and b March from TOMCAT simulations CNTL (control), fODS (fixed ozone-depleting substances), R2000, R2002, R2009, R2010 (repeating meteorology from 2000, 2002/2003, 2009/2010, and 2010/2011, respectively), R2000_NoIE (no increased CFC-11 emissions), R2000_NoVSLS (no chlorinated very short-lived substances), R2000_CFC11_67 (with constant CFC-11 emissions of 67 Gg yr−1), R2000_CFC11_B and R2010_CFC11_B (with additional CFC-11 emissions from box model for 2000 and 2010/2011 meteorology, respectively) (see legend) from 1960 to 2090. Panel b also shows mean (±1σ shading) chemistry-climate modelling initiative (CCMI) results from Dhomse et al.13 and observations from NASA Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instrument (black line). The coloured dots on the fODS line show the years used for simulations R2000, R2002, R2009 and R2010. The pink line in the background from 2018 to 2090 shows results of the continuation of run CNTL with 20-year repeating meteorology.

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