Fig. 7 | Nature Communications

Fig. 7

From: Discrepancy in scientific authority and media visibility of climate change scientists and contrarians

Fig. 7

Research article citation network—group and individual level. a Within-group and between-group citation flow as a percentage of the total number of citations produced across three researcher groups. Node size captures the net citation flow into a given group; link width is proportional to the fraction of the total citation flow, with link color indicating the source group. For example, 20.2% of the total citations are directed toward 224 climate change scientists (CCS) (corresponding to 0.44% of the total 50,442 researchers analyzed in the group-level citation analysis), whereas only 1.1% are directed toward the 224 published climate change contrarians (CCC); roughly 17 times as many citations flow from the CC Other to CCSs as from the CC Other to CCCs. b Nodes in the network are CCS and CCC researchers with at least one publication receiving at least one citation from another node (i.e., connected within the citation network); roughly 90% of the nodes are CCSs because 218 CCCs have no publications citing or cited by other publications within the set of publications by CCCs and CCSs. The links capture the total number of citations flowing from publications authored by scientist i to the publications authored by scientist j and are colored according to the source node; gray links are de-emphasized using low opacity level. Node size is proportional to the log of the total edge weight (citations) entering a given node. We used the Louvain modularity-maximization method48 to identify groups of nodes belonging to a particular community—i.e., groups of node that are more connected to other nodes within the cluster than without. These communities are plotted along each of the spines, with nodes ordered according their size, so that the most prominent individuals are located at the center. Each community contains several CCCs, located mostly at the peripheral (low-prominence) tips, with just a few exceptions. Word clouds show the 50 most frequent Web of Science publication keywords associated with each community; keyword size is proportional to the log frequency

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