Fig. 2 | Nature Communications

Fig. 2

From: Nanostructured polymer films with metal-like thermal conductivity

Fig. 2

Measurement of heat transport along the draw direction of the polymer films. a Schematic of the home-built steady-state thermal conductivity measurement system. A small temperature difference (Th − Tc) across a film sample is created and maintained using Joule heating (electrical heating power, Pel, see Supplementary Note 2 and Supplementary Fig. 1c, d for more details) and thermoelectric cooling inside a high vacuum chamber (Supplementary Fig. 1). b Measured electrical heating power (Pel) as a function of the temperature difference (Th − Tc) across films. The error bars represent the maximum and minimum electrical heater power values measured over the course of 1 min at a sampling rate of 1 Hz. (Supplementary Note 2 and Supplementary Fig. 1b, c). c Illustration of the two-color time-domain thermoreflectance measurement scheme. An aluminum-coated UHMWPE laminate is first heated with a 100-fs-wide pump laser pulse (400 nm, purple) and subsequently monitored with a time-delayed low-power probe pulse (800 nm, yellow). The change in aluminum reflectance is proportional to surface temperature variation in the linear regime. d Ten individual cooling curves in terms of signal amplitude (light red lines), overlaid with their average (thick red) and the best fit curve (blue solid) that yields a thermal conductivity of 31.9 Wm−1 K−1. Changing the best fit by 20% leads to large discrepancies between the simulated (blue dashed) and measured curves. Inset shows the corresponding phase signals, fitting to which yields a thermal conductivity of 32.8 Wm−1 K−1 (Supplementary Note 3)

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