Fig. 3 | Nature Communications

Fig. 3

From: Deep-water circulation changes lead North Atlantic climate during deglaciation

Fig. 3

North Atlantic deep/intermediate water 14C ventilation during deglaciation. a High-pass filtered (cut-off frequency 1/200 years) atmospheric radiocarbon content (Δ14C) corrected for changes in natural 14C production27, reflecting changes in global ocean ventilation and NADW formation28,29. b Comparison of bottom 14C ventilation histories (B-Atm) from core MD99-2284 (grey dots and dashed lines) and B-Atm records from the Faroe-Shetland Channel (1179 m)12 (red) and south of the Iceland-Scotland Ridge (1237 m)12 (orange) using benthic foraminifera (excluding Pyrgo spp. and Miliolids) (note the broken y-axis and scale change at 2500 14C years). c Same as in (b) using intermediate coral 14C records from Orphan Knoll108 and the New England Seamounts22,23,24,25 and deep/intermediate coral 14C records from the New England Seamounts22,23,24,25 in the northwest Atlantic Ocean (Fig. 1). d Same as in (b) using deep/intermediate coral 14C records from the Equatorial Atlantic26. Arrows show modern depth-averaged ventilation ages at each location. Histograms display depth represented by individual data points. Note that the 14C record from ref. 24 used here includes one measurement from the northeast Atlantic. Bars reflect 2σ errors of individual measurements. All records are presented on their independent time scale. Greenland stratigraphic events relative to the IntCal13 timescale are displayed at the top (GS: Greenland Stadial; GI: Greenland Interstadial; YD: Younger Dryas Stadial; BA: Bølling-Allerød Interstadial; HS1: Heinrich Stadial 1)