Fig. 4 | Nature Communications

Fig. 4

From: Hidden heterogeneity and circadian-controlled cell fate inferred from single cell lineages

Fig. 4

A simple model of cell division control by fluctuating protein levels cannot recapitulate the cousin-mother inequality. a Levels of protein X as a function of time during the lifetimes of two cells. The protein is said to be “mixing” since the production and degradation rates are high, leading to loss of memory of the initial protein level over the cellular lifetime. b Lineage correlations from 30 simulations (shown as black dots) generated by a model where the Protein X level passed on from mother to daughter cells control the hazard function for division of the daughters. As can be seen, the cousin-mother inequality cannot be recapitulated by this model and the mixing property of Protein X leads to negligible cousin correlations. c Protein X levels as functions of time in two cells when the protein is “non-mixing”: in this case, the production and degradation rates are low and hence the memory of the initial protein level is retained at the end of the cell’s lifetime. d Lineage correlations from 30 simulations (black dots) for the case of non-mixing Protein X. Once again the cousin–mother inequality cannot be explained, and the non-mixing property of Protein X leads to very large mother–daughter correlations. Parameters for the models in both b and d were chosen to recapitulate the correct sister correlation as observed in our experimental data (details in Supplementary section 6). The boxplots represent the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd quartiles of the lineage correlations generated in the simulations

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