Fig. 1 | Nature Communications

Fig. 1

From: Fossil lemurs from Egypt and Kenya suggest an African origin for Madagascar’s aye-aye

Fig. 1

Comparison of lower molar morphology of latest Eocene Plesiopithecus teras and early Miocene Propotto leakeyi and mandibular morphology and lower dentition of Plesiopithecus teras. a M1–3 of DPC 11636, left mandible of Plesiopithecus teras (reversed for comparison, latest Eocene, Quarry L-41, Fayum Depression, Egypt); b M1–3 of CGM 42291, holotype right mandible of Plesiopithecus teras; c Left M1 of KNM-RU 1879, mandible of Propotto leakeyi (reversed for comparison; Simpson’s specimen “S”; note that this specimen is probably from Songhor despite the Rusinga accession number); d Left M3 of KNM-RU 1879, mandible of Propotto leakeyi, reversed for comparison; e KNM-CA 1832, isolated right M1 of Propotto leakeyi (early Miocene, Chamtwara, Kenya); f KNM-CA 2195, isolated right M2 of Propotto leakeyi (early Miocene, Chamtwara, Kenya); g M1 of KNM-SO 508, holotype right mandible of Propotto leakeyi (early Miocene, Songhor, Kenya; Simpson’s specimen “R”); h M2 of KNM-SO 508, holotype right mandible of Propotto leakeyi; i M2–3 of KNM-RU 2084, right mandible of Propotto leakeyi (possibly from Songhor despite the Rusinga accession number; Simpson’s specimen “T”); j DPC 13607, left mandible of Plesiopithecus teras, with an alveolus that we interpret as being for a small canine, and tooth crowns that we interpret as I1 or I2 and P2-M2. Digital models were created using CT scans made available by the Duke Lemur Center Division of Fossil Primates and the National Museums of Kenya, which were downloaded from www.morphosource.org and made available for reuse under a CC BY-NC license. Map of Africa is adapted from Google Earth

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