Fig. 2 | Nature Communications

Fig. 2

From: Serendipity and strategy in rapid innovation

Fig. 2

ac Crossovers in the mean usefulness of components. The relative usefulness of different components changes as the number of components we possess increases. For example a, if you are only allowed six letters, the ones that show up in the most words are a, e, i, o, s, r. For gastronomy b and technology c, for clarity we only show the 40 components most useful when we have all N components. A pure short-sighted strategy attempts to acquire components in the order that they intersect the diagonal, whereas a pure far-sighted strategy attempts to acquire them in the order that they intersect a vertical. If there are no crossovers, the strategies are the same

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