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Overview of studies linking time spent on smartphones with blood pressure

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Correspondence to Jorge Andrés Delgado-Ron.

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Delgado-Ron, J.A. Overview of studies linking time spent on smartphones with blood pressure. Hypertens Res 44, 259–261 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41440-020-00540-x

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