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Body composition and nutritional status according to clinical stage in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

Abstract

The objective was to evaluate body composition and nutritional status in women with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) before receiving oncologic treatment. Women with cervical cancer diagnoses in clinical stage IB2 to IIIB were studied. Body composition was measured with bioimpedance, sarcopenia determined according to the European Consensus, and nutritional status according to the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment. A total of 155 women with age 50.4 ± 13.7, 29 clinical stage I, 82 II, and 44 III, were studied. Patients in advanced clinical stage III, compared with patients in stage II and stage I, lower phase angle (III: 5.2 ± 0.98 vs. II: 5.7 ± 1.9 and I: 5.8 ± 0.69, p = 0.007). Impedance vector distribution was different in patients in clinical stage III vs. those in clinical stage II (p = 0.014) and I (p = 0.039). LACC patients in advanced stages had worse body composition and nutritional status before treatment.

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Fig. 1: Body composition according to clinical stage in women with locally advanced cervical cancer.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Piccoli A, Pastori G for providing BIVA software. Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padova, Italy 2002. available at e-mail: apiccoli@unipd.it

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Conception and design: LFC, LCP, and LCM. Collection and assembly of data: JLM, MFL, and SAB. Data analysis and interpretation: LFC and RJL. Manuscript writing: LFC, LCM, and LCP. Final approval of manuscript: LFC, LCP, LCM, RJL, JLV, MFL, and SAB

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Correspondence to Lilia Castillo-Martínez.

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Flores-Cisneros, L., Cetina-Pérez, L., Castillo-Martínez, L. et al. Body composition and nutritional status according to clinical stage in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. Eur J Clin Nutr 75, 852–855 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-020-00797-y

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