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Epidemiology

A double-edged sword: the association of daytime napping duration and metabolism related diseases in a Chinese population

Abstract

Background

Some studies have suggested that daytime napping may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, limited data have revealed the association between nap duration and other metabolic diseases. Data from the baseline survey of Lanxi Cohort Study, a population-based study of natural residents in Zhejiang Province, China, were used to investigate the relationship between nap duration and metabolic abnormalities.

Methods

A total of 3236 participants underwent a physical examination, laboratory tests, and face to face interview. They were categorized into four groups according to nap duration. Logistic regression models were used to examine the odds ratios (ORs) of napping duration with four metabolism-related diseases. Stratified analysis was further used to explore the interaction effects of gender and age on results.

Results

Compared to the no daytime napping group, people who napped during the daytime for more than 1 h were independently associated with a greater prevalence of diabetes (OR 1.56). Those who napped during the daytime within a half hour showed a lower prevalence of fatty liver, dyslipidemia, and central obesity. To be more specific, those who habitually napped during the daytime for more than 1 h exhibited an increasing prevalence of diabetes among female older than 50 years old. Those who habitually napped during the daytime within a half hour exhibited a decreasing prevalence of fatty liver and dyslipidemia among male <50 years old, and that of central obesity among female <50 years old.

Conclusions

Short daytime napping duration is associate with reduced rate of metabolism-related diseases and may protects people from negative health conditions, whereas long daytime napping duration is associate with higher prevalence of diabetes, which then can be harmful for health.

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Fig. 1: Prevalence of four obesity related diseases among people with different napping duation.

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Funding

This work was supported by Cyrus Tang Foundation (No. 419600-11102) and China Medical Board (CMB) Collaborating Program (No. 15-216 and 12-108).

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Authors

Contributions

XZ was responsible for designing the study questions, methods, participating the data collection, interpreting results, and writing the manuscript. LC was responsible for designing the study methods, conducting the literature research, and interpreting results. CZ was responsible for major data analysis, interpreting results, and providing feedbacks with each update. SC was responsible for organizing the manuscript, updating the reference list, and providing feedbacks with each update. WL, MY, FY, and WZ was responsible for collecting the data, interpreting results, and providing feedbacks with each update. SZ is the PI of Lanxi Cohort and was contributed to designing the study, managing data collection, and providing feedbacks with each update.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Shankuan Zhu.

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Zhao, X., Cheng, L., Zhu, C. et al. A double-edged sword: the association of daytime napping duration and metabolism related diseases in a Chinese population. Eur J Clin Nutr 75, 291–298 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-020-00777-2

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