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Cationic amphiphilic bolaamphiphile-based delivery of antisense oligonucleotides provides a potentially microbiome sparing treatment for C. difficile

The Journal of Antibioticsvolume 71pages713721 (2018) | Download Citation

Abstract

Conventional antibiotics for C. difficile infection (CDI) have mechanisms of action without organismal specificity, potentially perpetuating the dysbiosis contributing to CDI, making antisense approaches an attractive alternative. Here, three (APDE-8, CODE-9, and CYDE-21) novel cationic amphiphilic bolaamphiphiles (CABs) were synthesized and tested for their ability to form nano-sized vesicles or vesicle-like aggregates (CABVs), which were characterized based on their physiochemical properties, their antibacterial activities, and their toxicity toward colonocyte (Caco-2) cell cultures. The antibacterial activity of empty CABVs was tested against cultures of E. coli, B. fragilis, and E. faecalis, and against C. difficile by “loading” CABVs with 25-mer antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) targeting dnaE. Our results demonstrate that empty CABVs have minimal colonocyte toxicity until concentrations of 71 µM, with CODE-9 demonstrating the least toxicity. Empty CABVs had little effect on C. difficile growth in culture (MIC90 ≥ 160 µM). While APDE-8 and CODE-9 nanocomplexes demonstrated high MIC90 against C. difficile cultures (>300 µM), CYDE-21 nanocomplexes demonstrated MIC90 at CABV concentrations of 19 µM. Empty CABVs formed from APDE-8 and CODE-9 had virtually no effect on E. coli, B. fragilis, and E. faecalis across all tested concentrations, while empty CYDE-21 demonstrated MIC90 of >160 µM against E. coli and >40 µM against B. fragilisand E. faecalis. Empty CABVs have limited antibacterial activity and they can deliver an amount of ASO effective against C. difficile at CABV concentrations associated with limited colonocyte toxicity, while sparing other bacteria. With further refinement, antisense therapies for CDI may become a viable alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank Dr. David Craft at Penn State Hershey Medical Center (Hershey, PA) for providing stocks of E. coli, B. fragilis, and E. faecalis used in this work. The authors also thank Ms. Maria Lozoya, M.S. at Midwestern University (Glendale, AZ) for her work with CAB preparations and size distribution measurements.

Funding

This project was funded by multi-principal investigator (Drs. Stewart and Sharma) award from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (1R21AI132353-01).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA

    • Arun K. Sharma
    •  & Jacek Krzeminski
  2. Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nanomedicine Center of Excellence, College of Pharmacy Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, 85308, USA

    • Volkmar Weissig
  3. Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 17033, USA

    • John P. Hegarty
  4. Department of Surgery, University of Arizona – Banner University Medical Center, Tucson, AZ, 85724, USA

    • David B. Stewart

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Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to David B. Stewart.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41429-018-0056-9