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Translatable gene therapy for lung cancer using Crispr CAS9—an exploratory review

Abstract

Gene therapy using CRISPR Cas9 technique is rapidly gaining popularity among the scientific community primarily because of its versatility, cost-effectiveness, and high efficacy. While the laboratory-based experiments and findings making use of CRISPR as a gene editing tool are available in ample amounts, the question arises that how much of these findings are actually translatable into measures helping in combating particular disease conditions. In this review, we highlight the important studies and findings done till now in the perspective of lung cancer with an in-depth analysis of various clinical trials associated with the use of CRISPR Cas9 technology in the field of cancer research.

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Acknowledgements

DS is supported by a start-up fund (SEED grant) from VIT, Vellore. DS is also supported by a Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) Funded Project (Sanction Order No.NCD/Ad-hoc/66/2016-17), a “Fast Track Young Scientist” grant (YSS/2014/000027) from the Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB), Department of Science and Technology (DST), Government of India and an extramural grant (BT/PR19625/MED/30/1703/2016) from the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India.

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Nair, J., Nair, A., Veerappan, S. et al. Translatable gene therapy for lung cancer using Crispr CAS9—an exploratory review. Cancer Gene Ther 27, 116–124 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41417-019-0116-8

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