Microdiversity ensures the maintenance of functional microbial communities under changing environmental conditions

Abstract

Microdiversity can lead to different ecotypes within the same species. These are assumed to provide stability in time and space to those species. However, the role of microdiversity in the stability of whole microbial communities remains underexplored. Understanding the drivers of microbial community stability is necessary to predict community response to future disturbances. Here, we analyzed 16S rRNA gene amplicons from eight different temperate bog lakes at the 97% OTU and amplicon sequence variant (ASV) levels and found ecotypes within the same OTU with different distribution patterns in space and time. We observed that these ecotypes are adapted to different values of environmental factors such as water temperature and oxygen concentration. Our results showed that the existence of several ASVs within a OTU favored its persistence across changing environmental conditions. We propose that microdiversity aids the stability of microbial communities in the face of fluctuations in environmental factors.

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Acknowledgements

We thank the North Temperate Lakes Microbial Observatory and Katherine McMahon’s research group for the collection of the original data. We also thank Guillermo Martín Serrano for his contribution during early stages of data analysis. This work was funded by grant CTM2016-80095-C2-1-R from the Spanish Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad. NG-G was funded by a student scholarship from the Severo Ochoa Program at CNB (SEV-2013-0347-17-2).

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FP-S, JT, and CP-A designed research. NG-G and FP-S performed research and analyzed the data. NG-G, FP-S, and CP-A wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and revised the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Fernando Puente-Sánchez.

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García-García, N., Tamames, J., Linz, A.M. et al. Microdiversity ensures the maintenance of functional microbial communities under changing environmental conditions. ISME J 13, 2969–2983 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41396-019-0487-8

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