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Fetal to neonatal transition: what additional information can be provided by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy?

A Correction to this article was published on 23 June 2022

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Abstract

This narrative review focuses on the clinical use and relevance of cerebral oxygenation measured by NIRS during fetal to neonatal transition. Cerebral NIRS(cNIRS) offers the possibility of non-invasive, continuous, and objective brain monitoring in addition to the recommended routine monitoring. During the last decade, with growing interest in early and sensitive brain monitoring, many research groups worldwide have been working with cNIRS and verified the feasibility of cNIRS monitoring immediately after birth. Cerebral hypoxia during fetal to neonatal transition, defined as cerebral oxygenation values below10th percentile, seems to have an impact on neurological outcomes. Feasibility to guide clinical support using cNIRS to reduce the burden of cerebral hypoxia has been shown. It is well known that in some cases cerebral oxygenation follows different patterns than SpO2. Cerebral oxygenation does not only depend on systemic oxygenation, hemoglobin content and cerebral blood flow, but also on cardiocirculatory condition, ventilation, and metabolic parameters. Hence, measurement of cerebral oxygenation may uncover problems not detectable by standard monitoring. Therefore, applying NIRS can provide caregivers a more complete clinical overview, especially in critically ill neonates. In this review, we aim to describe the additional information which can be provided by cNIRS during fetal to neonatal transition.

Impact

  • This narrative review focuses on the clinical use and relevance of cerebral oxygenation measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during fetal to neonatal transition.

  • During the last decade, interest on brain monitoring is growing continuously as the measurement of cerebral oxygenation may uncover problems which are not detectable by routine monitoring.

  • Therefore, it will be crucial to have additional information to get a complete overview, especially in critically ill neonates in need of medical and respiratory support.

  • In this review, we offer additional information which can be provided by cerebral NIRS during fetal to neonatal transition.

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(I) Conception and design: NBS, BS, GP, BU. (II) Administrative support: IB, HF, IL, NB, GL, MV, CBH. (III) Data analysis and interpretation: All authors. (IV) Manuscript writing: All authors (V) Final approval of manuscript: All authors

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Correspondence to Berndt Urlesberger.

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Baik-Schneditz, N., Schwaberger, B., Bresesti, I. et al. Fetal to neonatal transition: what additional information can be provided by cerebral near infrared spectroscopy?. Pediatr Res (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-022-02081-0

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