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Invasive fungal infections in neonates: a review

Abstract

Invasive fungal infections remain the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in neonates, especially preterm and very low birth weight infants. Most invasive fungal infections are due to Candida or Aspergillus species, and other fungi are increasingly reported and described. Appropriate identification and treatment are required to augment activity and reduce the toxicity of antifungal drugs. Successful use of antifungals in the vulnerable neonatal population is important for both prevention and treatment of infection. Strategies for prevention, including prophylactic antifungal therapy as well as reducing exposure to modifiable risk factors, like limiting antibiotic exposure, discontinuation of central catheters, and hand hygiene are key techniques to prevent and decrease rates of invasive fungal infections. In conclusion, this is a review of the most common causes, prevention strategies, prophylaxis, and treatment of invasive fungal infections in neonates.

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KEDW, SA and MPD participated in conception and design of the work. KEDW and SA drafted the article. PBS provided critical revision of the article. All authors approved final version for publication.

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Weimer, K.E.D., Smith, P.B., Puia-Dumitrescu, M. et al. Invasive fungal infections in neonates: a review. Pediatr Res 91, 404–412 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-021-01842-7

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