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Placebo response in RCT for antidepressant may not always be the ‘villain’ to fight: are KOR antagonists possibly affecting the intrinsic placebo response?

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Correspondence to Emilio Merlo Pich.

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Emilio Merlo Pich was the Global Head of R&D in Alfasigma SPA (I) from 2019 to 2022. In 2023, as CEO of Gelf Heath srl, he was consultant for Relmada Therapeutics Inc. (USA), Centessa Pharmaceuticals (USA), Novavido (I), and G-Factor (I). In 2024 he was consultant for Novavido (I), G-Factor (I), IFAB (I), BIP GROUP (I) and Tarnanai (CH).

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Merlo Pich, E. Placebo response in RCT for antidepressant may not always be the ‘villain’ to fight: are KOR antagonists possibly affecting the intrinsic placebo response?. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41386-024-01878-3

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