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In vivo imaging of dopamine D1 receptor and activated microglia in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a positron emission tomography study

Abstract

Alterations in the cortical dopamine system and microglial activation have been implicated in the pathophysiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), one of neurodevelopmental disorders that can be conventionally treated with a dopamine enhancer (methylphenidate) albeit unsatisfactorily. Here, we investigated the contributions of the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and activated microglia and their interactions to the clinical severities in ADHD individuals using positron emission tomography (PET). Twenty-four psychotropic-naïve ADHD individuals and 24 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) subjects underwent PET measurements with [11C]SCH23390 for the D1R and [11C](R)PK11195 for activated microglia as well as assessments of clinical symptoms and cognitive functions. The ADHD individuals showed decreased D1R in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and increased activated microglia in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) compared with the TD subjects. The decreased D1R in the ACC was associated with severe hyperactivity in the participants with ADHD. Microglial activation in the DLPFC were associated with deficits in processing speed and attentional ability, and that in the OFC was correlated with lower processing speed in the ADHD individuals. Furthermore, positive correlations between the D1R and activated microglia in both the DLPFC and the OFC were found to be significantly specific to the ADHD group and not to the TD group. The current findings suggest that microglial activation and the D1R reduction as well as their aberrant interactions underpin the neurophysiological mechanism of ADHD and indicate these biomolecular changes as a novel therapeutic target.

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Fig. 1: Regional binding potential (BPND) values of [11C]SCH23390 and [11C](R)PK11195.
Fig. 2: Regional correlations between [11C]SCH23390 binding potential (BPND) values and [11C](R)PK11195 BPND values.
Fig. 3: Regional correlations between the binding potential (BPND) values of each PET tracer and clinical variables of the individuals with ADHD.

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Acknowledgements

We express our gratitude to all the study participants and the staff of the Hamamatsu Photonics Medical Foundation, the Global Strategic Challenge Center of Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., and the Department of Psychiatry, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine for their assistance with data collection. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP16H06402 (Willdynamics) and 19K08014.

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Yokokura, M., Takebasashi, K., Takao, A. et al. In vivo imaging of dopamine D1 receptor and activated microglia in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a positron emission tomography study. Mol Psychiatry 26, 4958–4967 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41380-020-0784-7

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