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Association between neonatal intensive care unit medication safety practices, adverse events, and death

Abstract

Objective

Determine the associations between neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) medication safety practices, laboratory-based adverse events (lab-AEs), and death.

Study design

We combined data from a 2016 survey of Pediatrix NICUs on use of medication safety practices with 2014–2016 infant data. We grouped NICUs based on the number of safety practices used (≤5, 6–7, and 8–10) and evaluated the association between the number of safety practices used and lab-AEs and deaths using logistic regressions.

Results

Of the 94 NICUs included, 17% used ≤5 medication safety practices, 51% used 6–7, and 32% used 8–10. NICUs with more safety practices did not have a difference in lab-AEs or death.

Conclusion

In this cohort, the use of more medication safety practices was not associated with fewer lab-AEs or decreased death.

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Funding

This study was funded by grant #: NIH-5R21HD080606-02.

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Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

All authors have been involved in the study design, analysis, and manuscript revision. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. LEM is the guarantor who accepts full responsibility for the work and the conduct of the study, had access to the data, and controlled the decision to publish. LEM contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, the manuscript drafting, and the critical revision of the manuscript. CDR contributed to the conception and design of the study, and both supervised and contributed to the data acquisition and interpretation, manuscript drafting, and critical revision of the manuscript. PBS contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, and the critical revision of the manuscript. CB contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation and the critical revision of the manuscript. RHC contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data acquisition, the data interpretation, and the critical revision of the manuscript. CMC contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, and the critical revision of the manuscript. DKB contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, and the critical revision of the manuscript. CDH contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, and the critical revision of the manuscript. RGG had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. RGG contributed to the conception and design of the study, the data interpretation, the manuscript drafting, and the critical revision of the manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rachel G. Greenberg.

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RGG has received support from industry for research services (https://dcri.org/about-us/conflict-of-interest/).

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Miller, L.E., DeRienzo, C., Smith, P.B. et al. Association between neonatal intensive care unit medication safety practices, adverse events, and death. J Perinatol 41, 1739–1744 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41372-020-00857-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41372-020-00857-y

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