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Renal tubular transport protein regulation in primary aldosteronism: can large-scale proteomic analysis offer a new insight?

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Correspondence to Konstantinos Stavropoulos.

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Stavropoulos, K., Kassimatis, E., Doumas, M. et al. Renal tubular transport protein regulation in primary aldosteronism: can large-scale proteomic analysis offer a new insight?. J Hum Hypertens 35, 825–827 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41371-021-00537-0

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