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Adipocyte and cell biology

Regulation of thermogenic capacity in brown and white adipocytes by the prebiotic high-esterified pectin and its postbiotic acetate

Abstract

Objectives

High-esterified pectin (HEP) is a prebiotic able to modulate gut microbiota, associated with health-promoting metabolic effects in glucose and lipid metabolism and adipostatic hormone sensitivity. Possible effects regulating adaptive thermogenesis and energy waste are poorly known. Therefore, we aimed to study how physiological supplementation with HEP is able to affect microbiota, energy metabolism and adaptive thermogenic capacity, and to contribute to the healthier phenotype promoted by HEP supplementation, as previously shown. We also attempted to decipher some of the mechanisms involved in the HEP effects, including in vitro experiments.

Subjects and experimental design

We used a model of metabolic malprogramming consisting of the progeny of rats with mild calorie restriction during pregnancy, both under control diet and an obesogenic (high-sucrose) diet, supplemented with HEP, combined with in vitro experiments in primary cultured brown and white adipocytes treated with the postbiotic acetate.

Results

Our main findings suggest that chronic HEP supplementation induces markers of brown and white adipose tissue thermogenic capacity, accompanied by a decrease in energy efficiency, and prevention of weight gain under an obesogenic diet. We also show that HEP promotes an increase in beneficial bacteria in the gut and peripheral levels of acetate. Moreover, in vitro acetate can improve adipokine production, and increase thermogenic capacity and browning in brown and white adipocytes, respectively, which could be part of the protection mechanism against excess weight gain observed in vivo.

Conclusion

HEP and acetate stand out as prebiotic/postbiotic active compounds able to modulate both brown-adipocyte metabolism and browning and protect against obesity.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the projects EPIMILK—AGL2012-33692— and INTERBIOBES —AGL2015-67019-P— (Agencia Estatal de Investigación, MINECO/FEDER, UE). FG-C was funded by the University of the Balearic Islands.

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FGC performed all the experimental procedures and co-wrote the first draft of the manuscript. BC and JN participated in the design and supervision of the in vitro experiments. CP participated in the design and discussion of the in vivo experiments. AD worked on the implementation of the technique for the analysis of SCFA in rat blood and in their measurement, and collaborated in the work with the animals. AMR and AP participated in all the experimental design and supervised it, together with the direct supervision of FGC and AD and the data generated. AMR co-wrote the first draft of the manuscript. AP suggested the main topic of study and directed the research grants of funding. All the authors revised and approved the final version of the manuscript.

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Correspondence to Ana María Rodríguez.

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These authors contributed equally: Ana María Rodríguez, Andreu Palou

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García-Carrizo, F., Cannon, B., Nedergaard, J. et al. Regulation of thermogenic capacity in brown and white adipocytes by the prebiotic high-esterified pectin and its postbiotic acetate. Int J Obes 44, 715–726 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41366-019-0445-6

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