The Use of Synthetic Peptides in the Formation of Biophysically and Biologically Active Pulmonary Surfactants

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ABSTRACT: Synthetic pulmonary surfactants consisting of mixtures of phospholipids with synthetic peptides based on the amino acid sequence of human surfactant apoprotein SP-B were prepared. These surfactants were analyzed for their ability to lower surface tension on a pulsating bubble surfactometer and for their capacity to improve lung compliance and increase alveolar expansion in a fetal rabbit model of surfactant deficiency. The data demonstrate that several peptides, ranging from 17 to 45 residues in length, matching the carboxy-terminal sequence of the SP-B protein, when appropriately recombined with the phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine and phosphatidylglycerol (3:1), are capable of producing a synthetic surfactant with biophysical and biologic activity approaching that of human surfactant derived from amniotic fluid.

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Correspondence to Susan D Revak.

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Revak, S., Merritt, T., Hallman, M. et al. The Use of Synthetic Peptides in the Formation of Biophysically and Biologically Active Pulmonary Surfactants. Pediatr Res 29, 460–465 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1203/00006450-199105010-00010

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