Original Article

Clinical Research

Molecular alterations in prostate cancer and association with MRI features

  • Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases volume 20, pages 430435 (2017)
  • doi:10.1038/pcan.2017.33
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Abstract

Background:

Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) has been increasingly used for prostate cancer (PCa). Recent studies identified distinct molecular subclasses of PCa with recurrent genomic alterations. However, the associations between molecular alterations in PCa and characteristics on mpMRI are unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate recurrent molecular alterations in PCa and their associations with mpMRI features.

Methods:

Sixty-two PCa nodules >0.5 cm had a preoperative mpMRI. Nodules were evaluated for ERG rearrangement, PTEN deletion, SPINK1 overexpression, SPOP mutation and CHD1 deletion. Each PCa focus was matched to the corresponding location on mpMRI. Lesions were scored by single observer according to the PI-RADSv2 scale.

Results:

Of the 62 nodules, 22 (35.5%) were ERG positive, 6 (9.7%) had SPINK1 overexpression, 6 (9.7%) had SPOP mutations, 4 (6.5%) had CHD1 deletions and 1 (1.6%) had PTEN deletion. All of the nodules with CHD1 deletions were not visible on mpMRI (P=0.037). All of the nodules with SPINK1 overexpression were visible on mpMRI, although the association was not statistically significant (P=0.06). There were no significant associations between any molecular alteration with the severity of the PI-RADS scores (all P>0.05).

Conclusions:

This investigation represents the first description of an association between recurrent molecular alterations and the characterization of PCa nodules on mpMRI. This study can be considered hypothesis-generating for future studies to rigorously evaluate the association of specific PCa molecular subclasses with imaging features and potentially define specific subsets of PCa for which the utility of MRI is higher or lower.

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Acknowledgements

This study was funded by EDRN NCI U01 CA111275-09 (MAR and JMM), NCI R01 CA125612-05A1 and K08CA187417-02), the Prostate Cancer Foundation, and the Urology Care Foundation (Rising Star in Urology Research Award to CEB). CEB is a Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator supported (in part) by the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. This work was also supported in part by the Translational Research Program at WCM Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

Author information

Author notes

    • D Lee
    •  & J Fontugne

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

    • J M Mosquera
    •  & C E Barbieri

    These authors share senior authorship.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • D Lee
    • , B D Robinson
    • , A Sboner
    • , M A Rubin
    • , J M Mosquera
    •  & C E Barbieri
  2. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • J Fontugne
    • , K Park
    • , T Y MacDonald
    • , B D Robinson
    • , M A Rubin
    • , J M Mosquera
    •  & C E Barbieri
  3. Caryl and Israel Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • J Fontugne
    • , T Y MacDonald
    • , B D Robinson
    • , A Sboner
    • , M A Rubin
    •  & J M Mosquera
  4. Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • N Gumpeni
  5. Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • T Y MacDonald
    • , B D Robinson
    • , A Sboner
    • , M A Rubin
    • , J M Mosquera
    •  & C E Barbieri
  6. Department of Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA

    • A Sboner

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to J M Mosquera or C E Barbieri.