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CCDC98 is a BRCA1-BRCT domain–binding protein involved in the DNA damage response

Nature Structural & Molecular Biology volume 14, pages 710715 (2007) | Download Citation

Abstract

The product of the breast cancer-1 gene, BRCA1, plays a crucial part in the DNA damage response through its interactions with many proteins, including BACH1, CtIP and RAP80. Here we identify a coiled-coil domain–containing protein, CCDC98, as a BRCA1-interacting protein. CCDC98 colocalizes with BRCA1 and is required for the formation of BRCA1 foci in response to ionizing radiation. Moreover, like BRCA1, CCDC98 has a role in radiation sensitivity and damage-induced G2/M checkpoint control. Together, these results suggest that CCDC98 is a mediator of BRCA1 function involved in the mammalian DNA damage response.

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Acknowledgements

We thank members of the Chen laboratory for helpful discussions and technical support. This work was supported in part by grants from the US National Institute of Health (RO1CA089239 to J.C.) and the US Department of Defense breast cancer Era of Hope Scholar Award (W81XWH-05-1-0470 to J.C.).

Author information

Author notes

    • Hongtae Kim
    •  & Jun Huang

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208040, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

    • Hongtae Kim
    • , Jun Huang
    •  & Junjie Chen

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Contributions

H.K., J.H. and J.C. designed experiments and interpreted the data; H.K. and J.H. performed all experiments; H.K. and J.C. prepared the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Junjie Chen.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nsmb1277

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