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Solving the NES problem

Nature Structural & Molecular Biology volume 17, pages 12881289 (2010) | Download Citation

How can a single protein recognize and bind a variety of partner proteins that vary in sequence and structure? Analysis of the nuclear export receptor CRM1 provides new insight and surprising conclusions.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Iain W. Mattaj and Christoph W. Müller are at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.

    • Iain W Mattaj
    •  & Christoph W Müller

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  1. Search for Iain W Mattaj in:

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Iain W Mattaj or Christoph W Müller.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nsmb1110-1288

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