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Eukaryotic Lsm proteins: lessons from bacteria

Nature Structural & Molecular Biology volume 12, pages 10311036 (2005) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Over the last five years Sm-like (Lsm) proteins have emerged as important players in many aspects of RNA metabolism, including splicing, nuclear RNA processing and messenger RNA decay. However, their precise function in these pathways remains somewhat obscure. In contrast, the role of the bacterial Lsm protein Hfq, which bears striking similarities in both structure and function to Lsm proteins, is much better characterized. In this perspective, we have highlighted several functions that Hfq shares with Lsm proteins and put forward hypotheses based on parallels between the two that might further the understanding of Lsm function.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank our colleagues for stimulating discussions relating to this topic and apologize to the authors of studies that we were unable to cite owing to lack of space. We are grateful to O. Peersen for his help in generating the Hfq structure for Figure 1. Research in the Wilusz laboratory is supported by the US National Institutes of Health (grants GM072481, GM063832 and AI063434 to J.W.).

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  1. Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA.

    • Carol J Wilusz
    •  & Jeffrey Wilusz

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Carol J Wilusz.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nsmb1037

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