Perspective | Published:

N6-methyladenosine–encoded epitranscriptomics

Nature Structural & Molecular Biology volume 23, pages 98102 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic mRNA. Recent discoveries of the locations, functions and mechanisms of m6A have shed light on a new layer of gene regulation at the RNA level, giving rise to the field of m6A epitranscriptomics. In this Perspective, we provide an update on the various effects of mammalian m6A modification, which affects many different stages of the RNA life cycle.

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Acknowledgements

Research on RNA modifications in the laboratory of T.P. is supported by the US National Institutes of Health (EUREKA R01GM88599 and R01GM113194).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

    • Nian Liu
  2. Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

    • Tao Pan
  3. Institute of Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

    • Tao Pan

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Nian Liu or Tao Pan.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nsmb.3162

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