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Coordinating the impact of structural genomics on the human α-helical transmembrane proteome

Given the recent successes in determining membrane-protein structures, we explore the tractability of determining representatives for the entire human membrane proteome. This proteome contains 2,925 unique integral α-helical transmembrane-domain sequences that cluster into 1,201 families sharing more than 25% sequence identity. Structures of 100 optimally selected targets would increase the fraction of modelable human α-helical transmembrane domains from 26% to 58%, providing structure and function information not otherwise available.

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Figure 1: Flowchart of the analysis (Supplementary Notes 1 and 2).

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Acknowledgements

We thank I. Wilson, H. Berman, J. Chin and P. Preusch for critical comments on the manuscript. Research was supported by the US National Institutes of Health PSI:Biology grants U54 GM094662 (A.S., U.P.), U54 GM094618 (R.C.S.), U54 GM094625 (R.M.S., A.S., U.P.), U54 GM094584 (B.G.F.), U54 GM094599 (P.F.), U54 GM094611 (M.C.W., M.E.D., M.G.M.), U54 GM094610 (G.A.C., D.C.R., M.H.B.S.), U54 GM094608 (J.J.C.), U54 GM095315 (W.A.H., B.R., E.K.) and U54 GM094598 (D.L.S.).

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Correspondence to Robert M Stroud, Raymond C Stevens or Andrej Sali.

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Supplementary Figures 1–4, Supplementary Tables 1–3 and Supplementary Notes 1–4 (PDF 1656 kb)

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Pieper, U., Schlessinger, A., Kloppmann, E. et al. Coordinating the impact of structural genomics on the human α-helical transmembrane proteome. Nat Struct Mol Biol 20, 135–138 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1038/nsmb.2508

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