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From Levinthal to pathways to funnels

Nature Structural Biology volume 4, pages 1019 (1997) | Download Citation

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A new view of protein folding kinetics replaces the idea of ‘folding pathways’ with the broader notions of energy landscapes and folding funnels. New experiments are needed to explore them.

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  1. Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-1204, USA

    • Ken A. Dill
    •  & Hue Sun Chan
  2. dill@maxwell.ucsf.edu

    • Ken A. Dill

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nsb0197-10