Review

The role of semaphorins in immune responses and autoimmune rheumatic diseases

  • Nature Reviews Rheumatology 14, 1931 (2018)
  • doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2017.201
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Abstract

Semaphorins have a well-characterized role in guiding axon repulsion during development; however, the important contribution of these proteins in immunity is becoming increasingly clear. Immunoregulatory semaphorins, termed 'immune semaphorins', have roles in regulating immune cell activation, differentiation, mobility and migration. These proteins are also intimately associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). This Review discusses the pathogenic functions of immune semaphorins, as well as the potential use of these molecules as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

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Acknowledgements

We gratefully thank K.Mogi (Nihonbashi Medical) for help with editing the figures. This work was supported by research grants from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)-Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) and AMED (A.K.); Center of Innovation (COI) stream and Sports Research Innovation Project (SRIP) grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan (A.K.); and from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (A.K.).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Respiratory Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2–2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan.

    • Masayuki Nishide
    •  & Atsushi Kumanogoh
  2. Laboratory of Immunopathology, World Premier International Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 3–1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan.

    • Masayuki Nishide
    •  & Atsushi Kumanogoh
  3. Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED)-Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Osaka University, 2–2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan.

    • Masayuki Nishide
    •  & Atsushi Kumanogoh

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Contributions

Both authors researched data for the article, wrote the article, provided substantial contributions to discussions of its content and reviewed and/or edited the manuscript before submission.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Atsushi Kumanogoh.